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Most Significant Inventions of TIME

Humans are an intelligent species. From the making of first sharp-edged tool, to the development of rockets, several key advancements stand out as particularly revolutionary.

We may not know it but many things today are actually invented by the people of the ancient civilizations. From providing longevity to life to allowing us to explore the universe, inventions have made man realize his potential of thinking and creativity. Over the centuries, there have been thousands of inventions which were revolutionary for the human civilization. Here we present Most Significant Inventions of time:   

1. Remote Control

The first machines to be operated by remote control were used mainly for military purposes. Radio-controlled motorboats, developed by the German navy, were used to ram enemy ships in WWI. Radio controlled bombs and other remote control weapons were used in WWII.

Once the wars were over, United States scientists experimented to find nonmilitary uses for the remote control. In the late 1940's automatic garage door openers were invented, and in the 1950's the first TV remote controls were used.
Zenith began playing around with the idea of a TV remote control in the early 1950's. They developed one in 1952 called "Lazy Bones," which was a long cable that was attached to the TV set. Pushing buttons on the remote activated a motor that would rotate the tuner in the set. This type of remote wasn't popular for long considering that, at the time, there were very few channels to choose from.

2. Calculator

The original compact calculator was the abacus, developed in China in the ninth century. The young French mathematician Blaise Pascal (1623-1662) invented the first adding machine in 1642, a clever device driven by gears and capable of performing mechanical addition and subtraction. The first commercially successful adding machine was developed in 1886 by William Seward Burroughs (1855-1898). The "Millionaire," a machine invented by Otto Steiger in 1894, was the first adding machine also capable of direct multiplication.

3. Telescope

Galileo Galilei is commonly credited for inventing the telescope, but this is not accurate. While Galileo did not invent the telescope, he did design and build telescopes with increasingly higher magnifying power for his own use and to present to his patrons. He was a skilled instrument maker, and his telescopes were known for their high quality.

Galileo's first telescope was basically a tube containing two lenses. His first attempt was a three-power instrument; this was followed by one that magnified objects approximately nine times.

4. Antibiotics

The discovery of antibiotics began by accident. On the morning of September 3rd, 1928, Professor Alexander Fleming was having a clear up of his cluttered laboratory. Fleming was sorting through a number of glass plates which had previously been coated with staphyloccus bacteria as part of research Fleming was doing. One of the plates had mould on it. The mould was in the shape of a ring and the area around the ring seemed to be free of the bacteria staphyloccus. The mould was penicillium notatum. Fleming had a life long interest in ways of killing off bacteria and he concluded that the bacteria on the plate around the ring had been killed off by some substance that had come from the mould.

5. Printing Press

The printing press is considered one of the most important inventions in history. This device has made it possible for books, newspapers, magazines, and other reading materials to be produced in great numbers, and it plays an important role in promoting literacy among the masses.
During the 17th and 18th centuries there was a new interest in learning. Printing began to become very important as a means of communicating new ideas and discoveries.

The growth of newspapers played an important part in the expansion of the printing industry. Printers had been using wooden printing presses for 350 years, ever since Gutenberg produced his first printed sheet. With the tremendous demand for newspapers and other printed material towards the end of the 18th century, it was no longer possible to go on using the wooden printing presses.

6. X-rays

German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen in 1895, was experimenting with electrical currents through glass cathode-ray tubes. He ndiscovered that a piece of barium platinocyanide glowed even though the tube was encased in thick black cardboard and was across the room. He theorized that some kind of radiation must be traveling in the space. Röntgen didn't fully understand his discovery so he dubbed it X-radiation for its unexplained nature.

7. Pacemaker

During the late 1950s Wilson Greatbatch, a University of Buffalo Professor, was working with cardiologists to find a way to record human heart sounds. One day, while constructing an experimental machine for this purpose, he decided he needed to install 1 10,000-ohm resistor (a current regulating device). Greatbatch reached into his toolbox and inadvertently pulled out a 1,000,000-ohm resistor. It was an easy mistake to make – the colour codes on the tiny electrical components were almost identical: brown/black/orange for the type he was after, brown/black/green for the one he selected.
Once he had installed the 'wrong' resistor, Greatbatch checked the circuit. There was a pulse, then a second's silence, then another pulse. It sounded just like a heartbeat. 'I said 'wait a minute – this is a pacemaker!" the inventor later recalled.

8. Super Glue

Super Glue, also known as cyanoacrylate, was originally discovered in 1942 by Dr. Harry Coover. The original cyanoacrylates were discovered in 1942 in a search for materials to make clear plastic gun sights for the war, and scientists stumbled upon a formulation that stuck to everything that it came in contact with. However, cyanoacrylates were quickly rejected by American researchers precisely because they stuck to everything! In 1951, cyanoacrylates were rediscovered by Eastman Kodak researchers Harry Coover and Fred Joyner, who recognized its true commercial potential, and it was first sold as a commercial product in 1958.

9. Laser Guided Scissors

When it comes to cutting in a straight line I’ve been bad ever since elementary school. My excuse was to either blame the scissors or tell people that I must be using left handed scissors. As a result of my poor cutting skills the gifts I wrap show snippets of the actual gift and one time I gave my sister a haircut that made her cry. Thankfully, someone has invented the Laser Guided Scissors.

There’s not really much to explain. They slapped a laser onto a pair of scissors and that laser projects a straight beam that is picked up by the object you are planning to cut thus allowing you to cut with pinpoint accuracy. 

10. The Node Power Plug

The Node Power Outlet is clever and useful at the came time. MetaPhys of Japan has created a new style of electrical outlet which gets rid of many of the problem of traditional outlets. The two dual grooves curving around the wall plate are live with electricity in every inch. You can plug-in your lights, chargers, and other gear at any spot. Think about how much easier this could make like with your cell phone charger, MP3 charger, and other plug-in devices. The will not consume the entire outlet by covering up the other plug, since the other plug is the entire wall plate. (TIMExplore.com)

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